Are You Blogging?

As you may recall, in our previous blog post we asked four questions to help you evaluate and improve your online presence. These questions are:

1. Who is your audience?
2. Are you blogging?
3. Who is talking about you?
4. Are you doing too much?

In this week’s blog we address the second question of “Blogger’s Block,” just as nasty as writer’s block and perhaps more insidious as it can crop up weekly, every time you sit down to blog, giving you an excuse for not communicating with your community of readers.

To avoid Blogger’s Block, you need to know your audience—the members of your online community. Knowing who you are addressing in your blog will help you avoid not knowing what to write about. “Who Is Your Audience” is the first question you must ask yourself when seeking to improve your online presence; read about it here.

We suggest using an editorial calendar, a calendar devoted to what you will post on your blog and when. Your editorial calendar can look like a regular calendar or agenda; you can download pages off the Internet or buy a pocket calendar to use for planning your blog posts. You can even install an editorial calendar plug-in on your WordPress website.

As the first step in creating your editorial calendar, decide how often to post. You don’t need to blog daily; weekly is plenty. Choose a day of the week and be consistent. Blogging weekly leaves you space in your week to post spur-of-the-moment articles to your blog should you wish to respond to a pressing current event.

In your calendar, mark any special dates that you feel require a special blog post, such as historical events, holidays, anniversaries and the like that would be applicable to your audience.

Next, brainstorm a list of topics that your readers will find appealing. Keep this list on your smartphone or computer so that you have it handy and can add to it should inspiration strike throughout your day. Take those topics and turn them into article titles. You might get two or three articles out of one topic.

Now plug these article titles into your calendar. Aim to have a couple of months scheduled; now you’ll never be stuck for something to write!

In our next blog post, we’ll talk about how to increase your audience.

You may like these

Seniors and Publishing: Top 3 FAQ about Seniors and Books

Seniors and Publishing: Top 3 FAQ about Seniors and Books

Reading is one of the greatest things that humans do. Reading has allowed us to understand history, and for thousands of years, has been a significant pastime and form of communication. Books and other types of written text have helped humans grow and become masters...

read more
How to Self-publish a Hardcover Book

How to Self-publish a Hardcover Book

Frequently we are asked by our clients how to self-publish a hardcover book. Is it even possible? Yes, absolutely, and authors have several options. First, we need to point out that you cannot self-publish a hardcover book directly from Amazon KDP. Amazon KDP, the...

read more
Christopher Rosow: Author Story

Christopher Rosow: Author Story

Christopher Rosow self-published the first two books in his Ben Porter Series: Book 1, False Assurances and Book 2, Threat Bias. His author story reflects a perfect mix of planning, perseverance and luck. After False Assurances was accepted by a big-name agent, the...

What Is the Cost to Publish a Book?

What Is the Cost to Publish a Book?

Over the past year, we’ve been transitioning 1106 Design’s brand and look, culminating in a new website with new colors, new logo and a new message: We Provide Traditional Publisher Quality to Independent Authors. Our challenge all along has been to help authors...

Ethical Considerations for Writing Historical Fiction

Ethical Considerations for Writing Historical Fiction

Guest post by 1106 Design author, Gary L. Stuart. Visit Gary's blog The Ethics of Writing. “The one charm of the past is that it is past.” Oscar Wilde Persia Wooley wrote a fine “how-to” book in 1997 entitled, How to Write and Sell Historical Fiction.[1]  I bought it...